ARRA Business Funding Opps at NIH

Hmm. Two new business-oriented ARRA funding opps. Hopefully not bridges to nowhere … woo-woo.

Biomedical Research, Development, and Growth to Spur the Acceleration of New Technologies (BRDG-SPAN) Pilot Program (RC3)

LOI due: August 3, 2009
Application Due: September 1, 2009

U.S.-owned, for-profit enterprise/commercial organization doing a majority of its business in the United States may apply for RC3 funding. The requested budget is limited to $1 million total costs per year for a maximum of 3 years (up to 10 awards are anticipated).

The RC3 application Research Plan component is limited to a total of 13 pages, including 1 page for the Specific Aims and 12 pages for Research Design and Methods.

The BRDG-SPAN pilot program encourages projects representing, for example, the following:

  • a novel, “first in class” therapy
  • a material improvement over existing technologies
  • a potential substantial reduction in cost over existing technologies/products
  • U.S. alternative to foreign suppliers
  • a product for unmet, under-addressed medical needs (e.g., technologies to produce solid medication dosage forms for children, and therapeutic devices appropriate for children in terms of size and functionality)
  • a significant and demonstrable potential U.S. and/or global markets

Participating ICs list their own program officer and grant administrator contacts.

Small Business Catalyst Awards for Accelerating Innovative Research (R43)

LOI due: August 3, 2009
Application Due: September 1, 2009

Only United States small business concerns are eligible to submit SBIR applications. Budget requests are limited to $200,000 total costs for a maximum project period of 1 year (20-25 awards are anticipated).

The Research Plan is limited to a total of 7 pages, including 1 page for the Specific Aims and 6 pages for Research Design and Methods.

In accord with the funding priority of this initiative to attract applicants without a history of SBIR/STTR support from NIH, the focus of the projects solicited by this FOA is on early stage technology development. High-risk, high reward R&D that is unlikely to be undertaken by ongoing academic efforts or within industrial firms is strongly encouraged.

Again, participating ICs have designated their own program officer and grant administrator contacts.

3 Comments »

  1. Haven’t there been some wackaloon SBIR dumbfucks ranting and raving all over the blogosphere since the ARRA was passed that it is “anti-business”?

  2. ama said

    like all good wackaloons, there’s at least a shred of truth in that the standard SBIR/STTR set-aside (2.5%) was explicitly and specifically eliminated from ARRA spending, the upshot being that businesses could apply for ARRA funding just like anyone else, but that there was no separate grant mechanism. So these RFAs are, in effect, a partial restoration of the set aside (though by my calcs, at about a fifth the usual percentage).

    One can certainly argue about the wisdom or efficacy of SBIR spending (or ARRA spending, for that matter), but judged strictly by comparison to the usual SBIR set-aside, NIH ARRA spending is not great for small businesses.

  3. […] regard to ARRA small-business funding, apparently the recent RFAs — Biomedical Research, Development, and Growth to Spur the […]

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