Falsifying a Career

Update: Incredibly, Nature reports he is still misrepresenting his credentials in a very public way!

Nature reports on the plagiarism accusations against 63-year-old Hans Werner Gottinger, a German economist specializing in environmental science and technology. However, the article goes on to detail a career’s worth of flagrant and extensive plagiarism as well as falsified affiliations and appointments.

As far back as 1979, “Gottinger was sacked from the GSF national research centre in Munich because of deception relating to a European Union grant application” … yet in 1988, he became Director of the Fraunhofer Institute for Technological Trend Analysis, and “was shortlisted for the rectorship of the University of Klagenfurt in Austria in 1995, coming within a whisker of being elected.”

Quoth Nature, “Gottinger claims that he has ‘only scant recollection’ of events so long in the past, but insists that he did not intend to plagiarize. He adds that he has ‘sincerely apologized’ for any misunderstandings.”

Well, all right then, so long as he is sincere.

1 Comment »

  1. The issue of intent in plagiarism is a fun.
    Plagiarism is a falsification of authorship. It’s when someone who did not do something (ideas, writing, research, etc.) claims that he did it. Well, he surely knows that he didn’t do this. There is only one case of innocence: when he claims the work which he indeed did, but it just happened that someone else did it before and he did not know about it.

    In academia, the law of plagiarism is being falsified wildly. Look at this: “University of Toronto Fraud” at http://ca.geocities.com/uoftfraud/

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